Sages Ravine introduced 

Every bird is out singing at 4 am. I have never heard this many birds at once. And the way the sunlight hits the white canvas tent through a canopy of deciduous trees, the sound of a nearby creek…I have awaken into reality but one which feels more like a dream.   

But the dream fades and human reality slaps me around while I bury shit stained t.p., pick up cigarette butts, used tampons, dirty underwear…

 

Waterfall near Sages Ravine on the AT
 
The Appalachian Mountain Club has Ridge Runners look after Sages Ravine, a quiet and peaceful, biologically diverse world near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border. But Sages Ravine is on the mend after too many years of  unrestricted human use; humans with no concept of Leave No Trace. At peak times, there can be upwards of 100 people staying here. 

Last night there were no human sounds to agitate my murmuring hot mess of a heart and cause me to hold in my stomach. Sometimes I have to remind myself to breathe when humans make lots of noise; when they slam doors and cupboards and drawers, honk their car horns, talk real loud goddamn right I’ll be heard. 

But tonight I get a group of adults from Long Island and they don’t know what a privy is. One of them is whacking a tree with a stick.

Sometimes I have to remind myself to breathe.

Sometimes hikers unzip the care-taker tent when I’m asleep. One time it happened at 2 am and I almost let them unzip it all the way but then I yelled “Hey! This is my tent!” The last time I let someone in he intentionally showed me a porn pic on his phone. No more, never again. 

One day I find a ridiculous knife at Riga Shelter. Someone used it to smoke hash then left it. I place it within arms reach of the cot. 

  

8 thoughts on “Sages Ravine introduced ”

  1. Chance, thank goodness there are people like you out there. Thank you for what you are doing to help our parks/trails and hopefully getting through to those least coast folks who either don’t understand or don’t care about wilderness. Remember to take a couple deep breaths and count to 10 before going off on anyone. 🙂 Rich

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  2. You are too patient. If i saw someone hit a tree wit a stick, id hit them and see how they like it. Good on you for doing good and hopefully educating peeps!

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    1. Love the opening paragraph!

      “Every bird is out singing at 4 am. I have never heard this many birds before. And the way the sunlight hits the white canvas tent through a canopy of deciduous trees, the sound of a nearby creek…I have awaken into reality but one which feels more like a dream.”

      I’m sure we can all relate to what a special place this is and how its protection should be a major priority.

      Looks like your beginning to understand some of the challenging issues we deal with on a regular basis at AMC NW Camp. Makes me want to work even harder on LNT ethics and really would like to require LNT training as a penalty for anyone found whacking trees with a stick, at least in a perfect world.

      Thank you Amanda for your great insight.

      Rod Parlee

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  3. Ah, the sweet robin dawn song. You can set your watch and your calendar by it. Come the second week of July, it is no more. Our human swan song will no doubt persist a little while longer.

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      1. Nature savant with deficits lol. Hey whenever I see someone beating up on trees my gut level reaction is to say, in my best Bruce Lee voice-over, “You wanna fight? Fight me!” Have fun out there, Chance.

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